Infinitives Times Infinity

We had just recently been talking about infinitives in class and I honestly was just sitting there with a blank stare. It was one of those days.

Nonetheless, I Purdue Owl-ed it. You know, that website that you still go to in order to make sure you are doing MLA in-text citations correctly in your research papers. No? Just me. Okay.

Anyways, the Purdue Owl site is incredible, and if you haven’t checked it out be sure to.

Capture

 

They had a whole section on infinitives, which is what I needed. Thus, thanks to Purdue, infinitives can be classified as the following;

An infinitive is a verbal consisting of the word to plus a verb (in its simplest “stem” form) and functioning as a noun, adjective, or adverb. The term verbal indicates that an infinitive, like the other two kinds of verbals, is based on a verb and therefore expresses action or a state of being. However, the infinitive may function as a subject, direct object, subject complement, adjective, or adverb in a sentence. Although an infinitive is easy to locate because of the to + verb form, deciding what function it has in a sentence can sometimes be confusing.

Plus they included examples.

To wait seemed foolish when decisive action was required. (subject)

-Everyone wanted to go. (direct object)

-His ambition is to fly. (subject complement)

-He lacked the strength to resist. (adjective)

-He must study to learn. (adverb)

However, as the site states, be sure not to confuse infinitives with a prepositional phrase beginning with to. There’s always a catch. The rule is as follows:

Infinitives: to fly, to draw, to become, to enter, to stand, to catch, to belong.

Prepositional Phrases: to him, to the committee, to my house, to the mountains, to us, to this address.

 

Catch more on this with Infinitive Phrases soon!

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s